Blues De La Frontera

LP12 Vinil (Vinilissimo)

Available from 01/12/2011

21.50 €

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Pata Negra's fourth album, 1987's "Blues de la frontera", marked the end of the collaboration between brothers Rafel and Raimundo Amador but with it they reached their artistic pinnacle. They created a new genre described by themselves as "blueslería", from the words "blues" and "bulería", a flamenco style, and developed a new way of understanding fusion music in Spain. Liner notes in English and Spanish by expert Luis Clemente. +++++ We listen to this groundbreaking record today, almost 25 years after it invented those new languages, in a different manner. As Camarón himself put it, recognizing the talent of his apostles: "Pata Negra do what we all aspire to do, flamenco-rock." Like cavemen in space ships driven into the studio, late, by the success of "Guitarras callejeras", the new record would be the last one recorded by the Amador brothers together. By then Raimundo and Rafael were taking part in the recording sessions separately, and a little later, during the filming of the movie "Bajando al moro", they finally split for good. Ten years after the seminal "Veneno" album (the former project of the Amador brothers and Kiko Veneno), and with the road paved by "Guitarras callejeras", Nuevos Medios' Mario Pacheco - the track 'Lindo gatito' is dedicated to him - reached an agreement with producer Ricardo Pachón to release the definitive album. But it didn't look easy: there were no songs and the two brothers didn't speak to each other; ideas weren't coming along and the LP ended up being recorded at three different stages, more by chance that anything else. For example, at the last moment they recorded something as a filler, some scattered ideas joined up in a tanguillo style and with a chorus that is pure Eric Clapton; a mess in which roles change, as the drummer plays the bass, the guitarist programs a drum machine and Rafalillo handles the lead guitar (and let's not forget the palmas (clapping) by Matilde Coral's daughter and Elena Andújar). That's the way it is sometimes: in the end, 'Camarón' exceeded all expectations and became the strong track of the LP. But the first thing they decided to record was the jazzy tour de force represented by the covers of 'How High The Moon' and 'Pasa la vida', indolent sevillanas by Romero Sanjuán, as well as the bulerías based on Lorca's "Bodas de sangre" with Riqueni on guitar and the mestizo track par excellence which would title the LP, bulerías played with a guitar pick that recreate the falsetas (flamenco guitar parts) of philosopherguitarist Diego el del Gastor, who lived in Morón de la Frontera (hence the title). The second push came when in the summer of 1987 they put together an efficient band: Antoñito Smash on drums, Jesús Arispont (later of Def Con Dos) on bass and Juanjo Pizarro on guitar, who at the time also played with Silvio and Dogo. With them they got on to work and embellished four poems by Carlos Lencero, a frequent lyricist in Ricardo Pachón's productions. In the end, more that 14 people collaborated on the record. 
TRACKLISTING:  01. BODAS DE SANGRE 02. BLUES DE LA FRONTERA 03. PASA LA VIDA 04. YO ME QUEDO EN SEVILLA 05. HOW HIGH THE MOON 06. CAMARON 07. CALLE BETIS 08. LINDO GATITO 09. LUNATICO 

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